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James Carder

James Carder has 1 articles published.

James Carder
James Carder brings more than 23 years of experience working in corporate IT security and consulting for the Fortune 500 and U.S. Government. As Chief Security Officer & Vice President of Labs at LogRhythm, he develops and maintains the company’s security governance model and risk strategies, protects the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of information assets, oversees both threat and vulnerability management as well as the security operations center (SOC). He also directs the mission and strategic vision for the LogRhythm Labs threat research, compliance research, and strategic integrations teams. Prior to joining LogRhythm, James served as the Director of Security Informatics at a large non-profit medical center in Minnesota, where he had oversight of the threat intelligence, incident response, security operations, and offensive security groups. Additional experience includes serving as a Senior Manager at MANDIANT, where he led professional services and incident response engagements. He also conducted criminal and national security-related investigations at the city, state, and federal levels, including those involving the theft of credit card information and advanced persistent threats (APTs). James is a sought-after and frequent speaker at cybersecurity events and is a noted author of several cyber security publications. He is also an Advisory Board member for the University of Colorado, NewCloud Networks, and the Identity Defined Security Association (IDSA); a Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP), and a member of the Forbes Technology Council. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Information Systems from Walden University and an MBA from the University of Minnesota’s Carlson School of Management.

What Attacks on Government Can Teach Potential Victims About Ransomware Defense

In 2019 alone, government entities reported 163 ransomware attacks — a nearly 150 percent increase in reported attacks from 2018 — with more than $1.8 million in ransoms paid and tens of millions of dollars spent on recovery costs.

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