Placeholder
// by Homeland Security Today

HS Goes Mainstream

American colleges and universities are taking homeland security seriously—and producing the next generation of homeland security leaders.

Keep Reading

Placeholder
// by Homeland Security Today

More Data, Less Noise

New detection and surveillance technologies are providing enhanced capabilities, which should make security managers happy—as well as civil libertarians.

Keep Reading

Placeholder
// by Homeland Security Today

Ancient City, Modern Miracle

Until the last minute it wasn’t clear whether Athens could pull off a safe and secure Olympics, but it did. A look behind the scenes to see how it happened.

Keep Reading

Placeholder
// by Homeland Security Today

Not just safer—but safe

This is being written before Election Day 2004. I hope that as you’re reading it we all know who will serve as president in 2005.

The man who takes the oath of office on Jan. 20, 2005 will face daunting tasks with regard to homeland security.

Keep Reading

Placeholder
// by Homeland Security Today

Europe slumbers on

In early June, Italian police staged a majorcoup against the perpetrators of the March 11 bombings in Madrid withthe arrest of Rabei Osman El Sayed Ahmed, also known as The Egyptian.

Keep Reading

Placeholder
// by Homeland Security Today

Turkish captain sentenced and deported

On July 22, Yildirim Bayazer Tumer, a Turkish national who was the captain of the dry cargo vessel MV Cenk Kaptanoglu, allegedly threatened to detonate an explosive device when he docked in Philadelphia (as reported in the article “High Seas Security” in the September issue of HSToday). The Turkish vessel was ordered to a secure anchorage and allowed to unload its cargo on July 24.

Keep Reading

Placeholder
// by Homeland Security Today

Meeting match requirements

Matching requirements scare off many potentialgrant applicants and, by extension, many potential grant recipients.But in many cases, required in-kind matches may already be a part ofyour budget—if you know where to look. This article differentiatesbetween different cost-sharing strategies, usually outlined in therequest for proposals (RFP), and offers suggestions for meeting in-kindmatch requirements. Matches do complicate a proposal submission, butthey shouldn’t deter potential applicants from applying. If usedwisely, they can substantially strengthen the competitiveness of yourrequest.

 

Keep Reading

Placeholder
// by Homeland Security Today

A procurement system grows in Washington

When 22 agencies combined to form theDepartment of Homeland Security (DHS) in March 2003, only seven ofthose agencies came with procurement support. The department’s effortto establish new organizational processes and procurement procedurescreated new strains that further stressed the already difficult task ofconsolidating such a huge department.

Keep Reading

Placeholder
// by Homeland Security Today

The Shape of Homeland Security to Come: A Kerry Administration

Two things stand out in both on- and off-the-record interviews of Democratic supporters and non-partisan observers regarding the likely approach that an administration under Sen. John Kerry (D-Mass.) would take toward homeland security and the war on terror.

Keep Reading

Placeholder
// by Homeland Security Today

Rep. Jim Turner: The pillars of a Kerry plan

It’s easy to see why Rep. Jim Turner(D-Texas), the ranking minority member of the House Select Committee on Homeland Security, is considered by many of his colleagues to be a strong candidate to replace Homeland Security Secretary Tom Ridge under a Kerry administration. Turner has a sharp, articulate, innovative and pragmatic grasp of homeland-security issues, problems and fixes.

Keep Reading

Placeholder
// by Homeland Security Today

The Shape of Homeland Security to Come: A Second Bush Administration

The four years that have defined President George W. Bush’s first term have permanently changed the way we live. The very concept of protecting our nation—and our families—will never be the same. And Bush has characteristically pursued these changes his way: In decisive actions, without second-guessing. Applaud him or criticize him, Bush appears highly comfortable with his words and deeds.

Keep Reading

Placeholder
// by Homeland Security Today

No Target Too Small

In West Virginia, the efforts of county officials are paying off in unexpected ways—and providing an example for the rest of small town America.

Keep Reading

Placeholder
// by Homeland Security Today

Aiding the City of Angels

In a city like Los Angeles, where buildings are blown up and cars are routinely destroyed in the name of entertainment, it can be hard to determine when a disaster is real or just plain surreal. But on Aug. 5, when dozens of bodies littered the cargo area at the Port of Los Angeles and hundreds of police and fire officials swarmed the decks with guns drawn and fire hoses unraveled, residents were given a reality check on post-Sept. 11 life in this city.

Keep Reading

Placeholder
// by Homeland Security Today

Without A Hitch

The first big event of the summer, the Democratic National Convention in Boston, enjoyed flawless execution. Police Commissioner Kathleen O’Toole sat down with HSToday to examine what went right.

In the days and months leading up to the Democratic National Convention from July 26-29, Bostonians were concerned. Traffic delays threatened to cripple the city, raucous delegates would surely disrupt the nightlife and the possibility of a terrorist attack seemed to loom over crowded downtown. Few were as apprehensive as Beantown’s Police Commissioner Kathleen O’Toole.

Keep Reading

Placeholder
// by Homeland Security Today

The future of homeland security

“Prediction is very difficult, especially about the future.” — Niels Bohr

In our last edition, HSToday looked back at the progress—or lack of it—in homeland security since Sept. 11, 2001. In this edition, we look forward to what we can expect after the November election.

Keep Reading

Placeholder
// by Homeland Security Today

Uproar in Las Vegas

Amid allegations that they ignored warnings and put tourism ahead of terrorism, members of the Las Vegas office of the FBI, local law enforcement and state and city politicians responded by emphatically denying an Associated Press story that they said gave Las Vegas an unnecessary black eye.

Keep Reading

Go to Top
X
X