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// by Homeland Security Today

No Target Too Small

In West Virginia, the efforts of county officials are paying off in unexpected ways—and providing an example for the rest of small town America.

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// by Homeland Security Today

Aiding the City of Angels

In a city like Los Angeles, where buildings are blown up and cars are routinely destroyed in the name of entertainment, it can be hard to determine when a disaster is real or just plain surreal. But on Aug. 5, when dozens of bodies littered the cargo area at the Port of Los Angeles and hundreds of police and fire officials swarmed the decks with guns drawn and fire hoses unraveled, residents were given a reality check on post-Sept. 11 life in this city.

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Without A Hitch

The first big event of the summer, the Democratic National Convention in Boston, enjoyed flawless execution. Police Commissioner Kathleen O’Toole sat down with HSToday to examine what went right.

In the days and months leading up to the Democratic National Convention from July 26-29, Bostonians were concerned. Traffic delays threatened to cripple the city, raucous delegates would surely disrupt the nightlife and the possibility of a terrorist attack seemed to loom over crowded downtown. Few were as apprehensive as Beantown’s Police Commissioner Kathleen O’Toole.

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The future of homeland security

“Prediction is very difficult, especially about the future.” — Niels Bohr

In our last edition, HSToday looked back at the progress—or lack of it—in homeland security since Sept. 11, 2001. In this edition, we look forward to what we can expect after the November election.

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Uproar in Las Vegas

Amid allegations that they ignored warnings and put tourism ahead of terrorism, members of the Las Vegas office of the FBI, local law enforcement and state and city politicians responded by emphatically denying an Associated Press story that they said gave Las Vegas an unnecessary black eye.

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Supporting mom-and-pop tech shops

Small, for-profit companies can find research and development funding—they just need to know where to look.

Since 1982, Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) Programs have provided grants to businesses that employ 500 or fewer employees to foster research and development in areas critical to national interests.

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Unseen but powerful

Non-lethal directed-energy weapons just may be the next big development in counterterrorism and law enforcement.

The latest breed of non-lethal weapons being primed to enter the law-enforcement, security and military markets don’t just rely on rubber bullets or bulky nets; these high-tech weapons operate instead at light speed, shooting out laser beams, jolts of electricity and even high-powered microwaves.

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US-VISIT win bolsters Raytheon

The Raytheon Co., headquartered in Lexington, Mass., is looking forward to growth in its homeland security business following its victory as part of the Accenture team on the Department of Homeland Security’s US-VISIT contract. Worth as much as $10 billion, this contract represents Raytheon’s most important homeland-security win to date.

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Gerry Kolosvary, Marconi Federal

President, Marconi Federal

In Europe, Marconi is a household name, acorporate giant known for telecommunications and radio, headquarteredin Coventry, UK. In the United States, it’s a respected name in defenseand telecommunications—and those who were paying attention in historyclass remember that it was Guglielmo Marconi who first patented thewireless in 1896.

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Taking a Leap

America’s entrepreneurs represent a rich resource for homeland security—one that DHS is making an effort to mine.

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High Seas Security

The 9/11 Commission had some important suggestions that will help secure America’s ports and trade. The question is: Can the United States government and the shipping industry implement them soon enough?

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Indian outsourcing

Is data-handling in India secure enough for American needs? As the amount of data grows, so do the concerns.

With a huge amount of U.S.-based financial, personal and corporate information pouring through Indian servers daily, what percentage is at risk? Is sensitive information being tabulated, for example, in Bangalore or Mumbai more likely to be compromised than data sent through a server in New Jersey?

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Homeland security’s report card

This month we present the first of what we hope will be an annual edition: The Homeland Security Report Card.

I am constantly asked: Are we safer? The question comes not only from professionals in the field but from friends and family. This year it’s being asked all across the country, as security has swelled into a major focus of national debate.

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2005 Outlook: Homeland security funding

The presidential election is upon us, budget negotiations for the next fiscal year are underway and the last round of homeland security grants has been dispersed and, in many cases, spent. ‘Tis the season for budget prognostication FY 2005. Based on past and current trends, budget requests and a potential political power shift, where do we go from here?

 

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In search of a final fix

Will creation of a new National Counterterrorism Center improve information sharing among counterterror agencies?Where you stand on the issue depends on where you sit.

 

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Security under the skin

The time may be coming when injectable computer chips will be the ultimate form of ID.

An implantable human identification computer chip may be the next step forward in security.

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Light up ahead for the night-vision market

Advanced night-vision systems are proving critical in the war on terror overseas with their widespread use in Afghanistan and Iraq, but the domestic homeland security market remains slow to employ the devices despite their benefits. Keep Reading

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