CBP currency detection dog Cato (CBP photo)

Dulles CBP Officers Seize a Combined $60,000 in Unreported Currency from Turkey and Ghana Travelers

For the fourth time in two weeks, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers seized unreported currency from travelers at Washington Dulles International Airport.

Thursday night, CBP officers encountered a couple from Turkey who reported that they possessed $5,000. Officers advised the couple of federal reporting requirements and the couple confirmed that they understood and again reported $5,000. CBP currency and firearms detector dog Cato alerted to one of the couple’s bags and officers discovered a total of $20,654. Officers seized $20,000 and returned $654 to the couple for humanitarian relief.

On Saturday, CBP officers inspected a couple bound for Ghana who reported that they possessed $36,000, both verbally and in writing. While examining their baggage, CBP officers discovered a total of $40,781 in their possession. Officers seized $40,000 and returned $781 to the couple for humanitarian relief.

Previously, CBP officers seized $21,000 in unreported currency from a woman bound for Pakistan December 6, and officers seized $25,151 in unreported currency from a couple bound for Ghana November 30.

It is legal to carry large sums of currency into or out of the United States. However, federal law requires that travelers who possess $10,000 or more in currency or other monetary instruments must report it all to a CBP officer at the airport, seaport, or land border crossing when entering or leaving the country.

On a typical day, CBP seizes an average of about $290,000 in unreported or illicit currency along our nation’s borders. Consequences for violating U.S. currency reporting laws are severe; penalties may include seizure of most or all of the traveler’s currency, and potential criminal charges.

Read more at CBP

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