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Water-Starved Shrubs Likely Intensified Recent Wildfires in Southern California

Although many people think of forest fires when they think of large fires, forests only cover 10% of natural landscapes in Southern California.

Native shrubbery that died during a severe 7-year-long drought helped spread the 2017 Thomas and 2018 Woolsey Fires, according to research published in the journal, Ecosphere. These wildfires were ignited by electric power line failures and spread through vast areas of dead vegetation, directly impacting communities in Santa Barbara, Ventura and Los Angeles counties.

Evergreen, densely packed shrubs cover much of Southern California. These shrubs, called chaparral, are adapted to California’s wet winters and dry summers, but when one of the driest and longest lasting droughts hit the state from the end of 2011 to spring of 2017, landscapes normally filled with living green plants were left with grey-colored drought-killed remains.

Although many people think of forest fires when they think of large fires, forests only cover 10% of natural landscapes in Southern California. “Chaparral dominates the same landscapes that people dominate,” said Jon Keeley, a USGS research ecologist who led the study. “Our new research helps us understand how drought-stricken chaparral can help spread big fires that are close to where people live.”

To better understand how the drought affected chaparral, researchers studied Landsat satellite images of the burned areas. The stark difference in chlorophyll levels between 2010 and 2016 meant that a lot of shrubs that were alive in 2010 had died by 2016, their leaves dehydrated and unable to produce the green pigment.

Read more at USGS

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The Government Technology & Services Coalition's Homeland Security Today (HSToday) is the premier news and information resource for the homeland security community, dedicated to elevating the discussions and insights that can support a safe and secure nation. A non-profit magazine and media platform, HSToday provides readers with the whole story, placing facts and comments in context to inform debate and drive realistic solutions to some of the nation’s most vexing security challenges.

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