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Tuesday, May 21, 2024

$250,000 Reward Offered for Information in Search for Bomber in 2008 Times Square Attack

Details of this bombing are similar to those of two other unsolved bombings that occurred in New York City.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation announced a reward of up to $250,000 for information leading to the identification, arrest, and conviction of the suspect or suspects involved in the unsolved 2008 bombing of the United States Armed Forces Recruiting Station in Times Square. The suspect(s) may be connected to two other unsolved bombings in New York City—one at the British Consulate in 2005 and the other at the Mexican Consulate in 2007.

Through the course of the investigation, several people of interest have been identified and are actively being pursued. The origin of the components of the explosive device has been identified and is being investigated. The FBI’s Joint Terrorism Task Force thanks those who have come forward and assisted with the investigation thus far but stresses that the public’s help is still needed. The case remains a top priority of the FBI’s Joint Terrorism Task Force due to the seriousness of the crime. There is no statute of limitations.

“Fifteen years may have passed since the bombing occurred, but the New York JTTF is unwavering in the pursuit of justice in this case,” said FBI Assistant Director in Charge Michael J. Driscoll. “If you have any information about this incident or those responsible for it, please contact us.”

Early on the morning of Thursday, March 6, 2008, a bomb exploded in New York’s Times Square at the Armed Forces Recruiting Station. The suspect rode a blue Ross bicycle west on 37th Street, took a right up Sixth Avenue, and made a left on 47th Street before turning left down Seventh Avenue. The suspect got off his bike near the recruiting station at West 43rd Street and Seventh Avenue, placed the explosive device at the recruiting station, lit a fuse, and fled the scene on the bicycle. Although the suspect appears to be working alone, he or she may have had a lookout or surveillance team of as many as five other individuals in Times Square at the time of the attack. The suspect then rode his or her bike south on Broadway before turning left on 38th Street. The bike was later recovered in a dumpster near Madison Avenue and 38th Street. The suspect on the bicycle was last seen wearing a gray sweatshirt and pants of an undetermined color. The height, weight, age, sex, and race of the suspect are unknown.

The explosive device was built using an ammunition can. It was filled halfway with black powder and detonated using a time fuse. Although no one was wounded, the device could have caused significant casualties if people had been close to the blast.

Details of this bombing are similar to those of two other unsolved bombings that occurred in New York City—one at the British Consulate in May 2005 and the other at the Mexican Consulate in October 2007. All of the devices were delivered by an individual on a bicycle and were detonated between 3 a.m. and 4 a.m. The incidents may be connected.

A reward of up to $250,000 is being offered for information leading to the identification, arrest, and conviction of the person(s) responsible for the 2008 bombing of the U.S. Armed Forces Recruiting Station. Any information about the suspect(s), the bicycle, or any other details could be pertinent. Anyone with information on any of the three bombings is encouraged to call the FBI at 212-384-1000. Tipsters may remain anonymous.

Read more at FBI

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Homeland Security Today
The Government Technology & Services Coalition's Homeland Security Today (HSToday) is the premier news and information resource for the homeland security community, dedicated to elevating the discussions and insights that can support a safe and secure nation. A non-profit magazine and media platform, HSToday provides readers with the whole story, placing facts and comments in context to inform debate and drive realistic solutions to some of the nation’s most vexing security challenges.
Homeland Security Today
Homeland Security Todayhttp://www.hstoday.us
The Government Technology & Services Coalition's Homeland Security Today (HSToday) is the premier news and information resource for the homeland security community, dedicated to elevating the discussions and insights that can support a safe and secure nation. A non-profit magazine and media platform, HSToday provides readers with the whole story, placing facts and comments in context to inform debate and drive realistic solutions to some of the nation’s most vexing security challenges.

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