Subject Matter Areas

Emergency Preparedness - page 354

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// by Homeland Security Today

Tunnel Visions

Inside one of America’s most unusual training grounds, elite units prepare for the worst.

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// by Homeland Security Today

Public affairs in a box: Preparing before disaster strikes

Public Affairs Offices (PAOs) provide the face and the voice of their emergency management agencies. Whether addressing the general public or first responders, public affairs practitioners must use every medium to disseminate effective, timely and accurate information.

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Virtual Response

Someday, first responders in training may feel the heat and face the danger—virtually.

 

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// by Homeland Security Today

Emergency Response: Intensive Care Needed

Sometime this fall, the results of the TOPOFF 3 exercise will be made public. Authorities expect the after-action report to reveal—provided it isn’t sugarcoated—that, had this been an actual bioterror attack, the emergency healthcare infrastructure where the fictitious attacks took place would have collapsed under the weight of the sudden onslaught of so many sick and dying.

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// by Homeland Security Today

Spinning the ‘smart shirt’

Scientists are weaving new technology into an old item of apparel, giving it a dazzling array of possibilities that could save lives in the future.

Imagine a shirt that monitors your body’s vital signsin combat conditions, detects bullet wounds and can sense the presence of chemical weapons to automatically seal, clean and decontaminate itself.

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Strong as a snail

Scientists are looking to a lowly mollusk to learn the secrets that will make the next generation of body armor.

 

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The Lessons of Anthrax Autumn

As a panicked government desperately tried to identify the terrorists responsible for the Sept. 11, 2001, holocaust and to learn whether additional attacks were on the way, the nation was rattled by the unnerving possibility that it also was under bioterror attack. Within weeks of the Sept. 11 attack, letters containing anthrax spores—some highly refined to make them “aerosolized”—began arriving at the offices of news media personnel and US senators.

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2005 Outlook: Homeland security funding

The presidential election is upon us, budget negotiations for the next fiscal year are underway and the last round of homeland security grants has been dispersed and, in many cases, spent. ‘Tis the season for budget prognostication FY 2005. Based on past and current trends, budget requests and a potential political power shift, where do we go from here?

 

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HAZMAT grants: A culture of cooperation

A tanker overturns on the Interstate outside a rural township; drums containing flammable chemicals are punctured in a factory; a fire at a local chemical plant requires the evacuation of nearby residents. Similar events may havehappened in your community. It’s also likely that most members of your community were unaffected or even unaware of these incidents. This is due to the planning, prevention and mitigation efforts of Local Emergency Planning Committees and the first responders who implement their policies. Since 1992, these groups have been aided through the Hazardous Materials Emergency Preparedness (HMEP) grant program, which awards funds to states, territories and tribal governments to support key training and planning activities.

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Dude, where’s my grant?

Everyone knows that federal money is slow in coming but no one was sure exactly where the bottleneck lay. A pair of official studies looked at the problem—and revealed some surprising answers.

 

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State homeland security grants: What constitutes pass-through?

Applications for the 2004 State Homeland Security grants, administered by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), were due to DHS by November 30, 2003. As most first responders probably know by now, the states are required to pass through 80 percent of these funds to the local level. What you may not know is what exactly “pass-through” means, and what the implications are of your state’s pass-through approach on your ability to seek and obtain funds from the program.

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2005 Appropriations: What they mean for grant funding

Potential grant applicants need to be aware that in fiscal 2005 all state and local preparedness grant funding will be administered by the Office of State and Local Government Coordination (OSLGC) in the Department of Homeland Security (DHS).

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