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Emergency Preparedness - page 681

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// by Homeland Security Today

Pentagon Assesses WMD Response Training

A recent report has outlined weaknesses in the Defense Department’s training and education doctrine for military personnel who could be involved in the response to an unconventional weapons incident, Inside Missile Defense reported.

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// by Homeland Security Today

DC Launches New Emergency Preparedness Web Site

The District of Columbia Homeland Security and Emergency Management Agency (HSEMA) has launched a redesigned web site today in the hopes that it will help D.C. residents better prepare for emergencies. The site, called 72hours.dc.gov, lists emergency resource information by topic.

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// by Homeland Security Today

Riding Into the Hot Zone

First responders have become acutely conscious of the importance of interoperable command, control and communications. Today, they have a variety of options when choosing the vehicles that will support them on the scene.

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// by Homeland Security Today

Local First Responders: America’s First Line of Defense

Recently, responders and academics have trumpeted multiple emergencies as the next big threat to American security. These new threats include avian influenza, massive hurricanes and devastating earthquakes. Global media produce hundreds of stories calling attention to these looming disasters.

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// by Homeland Security Today

Never too late to get it right

Colorado State University hurricane expert Dr. William M. Gray predicts 17 named storms, nine hurricanes and five intense hurricanes for the 2006 season, which began June 1. And though it's been seven months since Katrina's aftermath devastated the Gulf Coast region, we're not nearly ready to handle another major disaster.


 

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// by Homeland Security Today

Funding the first 72 hours

Under the current framework for emergency preparedness, the burden of initial response falls largely to states and local governments. Historically, the Federal Emergency Management Agency has established 72-hours as the maximum amount of time for emergency response teams to arrive on scene, leaving local citizens vulnerable during what the National Response Plan refers to as “the initial 72-hour period of self-sufficiency.”

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// by Homeland Security Today

Tunnel Visions

Inside one of America’s most unusual training grounds, elite units prepare for the worst.

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