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Infrastructure Security - page 224

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// by Homeland Security Today

US Reports Say Rising Sea Levels Threaten Infrastructure

A rise in sea levels and other changes fueled by global warming threaten roads, rail lines, ports, airports and other important infrastructure in the United States, according to new US government reports, and policy makers and planners should be acting now to avoid or mitigate their effects.

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Bush’s Double-Edged CyberSecurity Plan

Since January, the Bush administration has committed to spending billions to keep the government's computer networks safe from cyberspies and other malicious hackers. But to keep digital intruders away from sensitive government information, some worry the government will have to do some spying of its own--on the U.S. private sector.

 

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// by Homeland Security Today

DHS: US Health Care Records are the Target of Foreign Hackers

Mark Walker of DHS Critical Infrastructure Protection Division recently told a National Institute of Standards and Technology workshop that the hackers' primary motive seems to be espionage. For example, any health problems among the nation's leaders would be of interest to potential enemies, he said.

 

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CIOs Uncensored: Security Smarts

"Thank goodness it wasn't us!" We can't help it. Every time another nasty cybersecurity failure makes headlines, our eyes roll heavenward and we breathe a sigh of relief. Yet, while we have great empathy for the CIO at the enterprise that just got nailed, we know there's a bullet somewhere with our name on it.

 

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New Funding to Protect Cyberassets Catches Industry Attention

With federal government spending on cybersecurity set to sharply increase in the final budget submitted by the Bush administration, contractors are looking hard for fresh business opportunities. Although opportunities are starting to take shape, they are not as clear as some contractors would like.

 

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The Evolution of Cyber Warfare

In the spring of 2007, when Estonian authorities removed a monument to the Red Army from its capital city, Tallinn, a diplomatic row erupted with neighboring Russia. Estonian nationalists regard the army as occupiers and oppressors, a sentiment that dates to the long period of Soviet rule following the Second World War, when the Soviet Union absorbed all three Baltic states. Ethnic Russians, who make up about a quarter of Estonia’s 1.3 million people, were nonetheless incensed by the statue’s treatment and took to the streets in protest. Estonia later blamed Moscow for orchestrating the unrest; order was restored only after US and European diplomatic interventions. But the story of the “Bronze Statue” did not end there. Days after the riots the computerized infrastructure of Estonia’s high-tech government began to fray, victimized by what experts in cybersecurity termed a coordinated “denial of service” attack. A flood of bogus requests for information from computers around the world conspired to cripple (Wired) the websites of Estonian banks, media outlets, and ministries for days. Estonia denounced the attacks as an unprovoked act of aggression from a regional foe (though experts still disagree on who perpetrated it—Moscow has denied any knowledge). Experts in cybersecurity went one step further: They called it the future of warfare.

 

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// by Homeland Security Today

Cuts Hobble Federal Protective Service

When Congress agreed in November 2002 to move the Federal Protective Service to the newly created Homeland Security Department, the goals were laudable: to improve the protection of employees and visitors at 8,800 federal buildings nationwide and raise the stature of police officers and inspectors at the agency.

 

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Black Hat D.C. 2008 begins

On Wednesday, Black Hat D.C. 2008 gets under way, after two days of intense training sessions. The D.C. Black Hat security conference is much smaller than the summer Black Hat USA in Las Vegas. But what D.C. lacks in size, it makes up for in sessions and talks.

 

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Experts Find Fault with Cyberdirective

When President Bush issued a classified cybersecurity directive early last month, he reversed 21 years of policy that had prevented the Defense Department and the National Security Agency from having oversight of civilian agency networks.

 

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// by Homeland Security Today

Amtrak outlines security features

Amtrak's new 15-member security teams, heavily armed and "exceedingly polite," will show up in force this week at Northeast rail stations, trying to secure a system that is inherently vulnerable to terrorist attack. Keep Reading

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Legislation Will Help Border Port Authorities to Develop Critical Infrastructure

The Greater Yuma Port Authority and District 24 legislators have been working diligently during the last few years to make the San Luis II commercial port of entry a reality. The project received an added boost last year when the District 24 delegation secured $2.5 million for this port, the first land port of entry to bebuilt in a decade.

 

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// by Homeland Security Today

Terrorist Use of the Internet

Lawmakers in the United States and elsewhere should not to try to censor Islamic extremists’ use of the Internet, says a new report from a global think tank. "There is no censorship option," Greg Austin, vice president of the East West Institute, told United Press International. "Trying to suppress anything (on the Internet) except direct… Keep Reading

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Saboteurs May Have Cut Mideast Telecom Cables

Damage to several undersea telecom cables that caused outages across the Middle East and Asia could have been an act of sabotage, the International Telecommunication Union said on Monday. "We do not want to preempt the results of ongoing investigations, but we do not rule out that a deliberate act of sabotage caused the damage… Keep Reading

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Federal Protective Service woes could threaten building security

The Federal Protective Service's budget shortfalls and shrinking workforce could threaten the physical security of government buildings, according to preliminary findings from the Government Accountability Office. FPS, the agency charged with providing physical security and law enforcement services to approximately 8,800 facilities owned or leased by the General Services Administration, was transferred in 2003 from GSA to the Homeland Security Department's Immigration and Customs Enforcement bureau. Since then, FPS has faced multimillion-dollar funding shortages and ensuing management challenges. Keep Reading

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British Thinktank Highlights Infrastructure Threats

Threats to Britain's national security go far beyond terrorism and traditional concerns about military defence and include climate change, energy supplies, and disease, the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) warns today. New frontlines are emerging in the battle to safeguard our security, the thinktank says. Keep Reading

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GCC: Cable breaks and IT infrastructure woes

When two underwater fibre optic cables broke just off the coast of Egypt on January 30th, internet and telecoms services to not only Egypt but across the wider Middle East and as far away as Pakistan, India and Bangladesh were severely affected.oncerns about the adequacy of the region's IT infrastructure were thrown into sharp relief. Keep Reading

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// by Homeland Security Today

Cyberterrorism, Inc

A new report says that 2008 will see an expansion of economic espionage in which nation-states and companies will use cybertheft of data to gain economic advantage in multinational deals. Senior analyst Tom Donahue told at a cybersecurity conference in New Orleans last month that the CIA had information about cyberintrusions into power and utility systems, followed by extortion demands, from multiple regions outside the US. The CIA suspected, Donahue added, that some of the attacks benefited from inside knowledge. Keep Reading

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FAA wants help becoming cybersecurity shared-services provider

The Federal Aviation Administration wants to become a shared-services provider under the Security Line of Business initiative. In a market survey released on FedBizOpps.gov last week, FAA asked for support services for a “leading edge cybersecurity management center.” Keep Reading

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