The Los Angeles-class fast attack submarine USS Oklahoma City (SSN 723), assigned to Commander, Submarine Squadron 15, enters the floating dry dock Arco (ARDM 5) for a scheduled maintenance period. Arco is a Commander, Submarine Squadron 11 asset under the operational control of Commander, Submarine Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Derek A. Harkins)

GAO: Persistent and Substantial Ship and Submarine Maintenance Delays Hinder Efforts to Rebuild Readiness

The Navy continues to face persistent and substantial maintenance delays that hinder its ability to stay ready for operations and training. Since fiscal year 2014, Navy ships have spent over 33,700 more days in maintenance than expected. Insufficient shipyard capacity and a shortage of skilled workers are among the contributing factors the Government Accountability Office identified.

The Navy has efforts underway to improve its maintenance operations. They will require years to implement, sustained management attention, and greater funding.

In the reports upon which this testimony is based, GAO made 17 recommendations. Only 6 have been fully carried out.

GAO identified multiple factors that contribute to maintenance delays, including insufficient shipyard capacity, shortage of skilled personnel, and deferred maintenance during operational deployments, among others. Ships awaiting or delayed in maintenance incur operating and support costs. For example, GAO estimated that the Navy spent more than $1.5 billion in support costs from fiscal years 2008 through 2018 due to delayed maintenance for attack submarines.

The Navy has several efforts underway to improve its maintenance operations, but they will take years to implement, and will require sustained management attention and funding above current levels. For example, the Navy estimates it will take 20 years to improve the infrastructure at its shipyards, 4 years to restore ship crew levels, and several years to improve maintenance planning. Until the Navy addresses these challenges, it will be hindered in its ability to rebuild readiness and prepare for the future, particularly as it grows the size of the fleet.

The 2018 National Defense Strategy emphasizes that restoring and retaining readiness is critical to success in the emerging security environment. The Navy is working to rebuild its readiness while also growing and modernizing its aging fleet of ships. A critical component of rebuilding Navy readiness is implementing sustainable operational schedules, which hinge on completing maintenance on time. GAO has reported that the Navy faces persistent challenges with completing required maintenance on time.

Read the GAO report

(Visited 87 times, 1 visits today)

The Government Technology & Services Coalition's Homeland Security Today (HSToday) is the premier news and information resource for the homeland security community, dedicated to elevating the discussions and insights that can support a safe and secure nation. A non-profit magazine and media platform, HSToday provides readers with the whole story, placing facts and comments in context to inform debate and drive realistic solutions to some of the nation’s most vexing security challenges.

Leave a Reply

Latest from Exclude from Homepage

Go to Top
X
X