Chief Construction Electrician Daniel Luberto, right, and Construction Mechanic 3rd Class Andersen Gardner, with Underwater Construction Team 2 Construction Dive Detachment Bravo (UCT2 CDDB), remove corroded zinc anodes from an undersea cable at the Pacific Missile Range Facility Barking Sands, Hawaii, on July 5, 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Charles E. White)

Undersea Cables: The Greatest Risk to National Security You’ve Never Heard of

Tensions with Russia are increasing with no end in sight. Over the course of the last year, the House discussed at length Russia’s successful attempts to meddle in our election — affecting what Americans hold most dear: our democracy. But now, Russia — through intensified submarine activity — is threatening our undersea cables. Should we be worried? Probably more than you think.

In a world of wireless and cloud computing, many imagine invisible waves jumping from the Earth toward satellites in space and back down. But that’s not how it works — not really.

The truth is, for the most part, the internet is more physical than many believe; we aren’t internationally connected by satellites in the sky, but by cables deep under the ocean’s surface.

Read more at C4ISRNET

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The Government Technology & Services Coalition's Homeland Security Today (HSToday) is the premier news and information resource for the homeland security community, dedicated to elevating the discussions and insights that can support a safe and secure nation. A non-profit magazine and media platform, HSToday provides readers with the whole story, placing facts and comments in context to inform debate and drive realistic solutions to some of the nation’s most vexing security challenges.

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