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Pandemic/Biohazard - page 352

// by Homeland Security Today

A Safer Home on the Range

People have to eat—and the livestock and poultry that feed them are as subject to biohazards, terrorism and pandemics as their human owners. Is enough being done to protect them? Keep Reading

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CDC Uses New Solution to Alert Public Health Officials and Public Health Departments

CIBER Inc. has successfully designed, built, and implemented a service-oriented architecture (SOA)-based software application called CDC Alerting Service (CDCAS) for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). CDCAS reliably, securely, and quickly alerts public health officials and public health organizations of disease outbreaks, bioterrorism events, and other public health events using a wide range of personal communication devices, such as domestic and international phones, satellite phones, e-mail, text messages, faxes, and pagers. As a result, CDC has an efficient, cost-effective method to ensure that public health officials are alerted to significant situations, regardless of their geographic location or preferred method of communication.

 

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// by Homeland Security Today

Flu Vaccine Not As Reliable This Year

Some patients who've had the flu shot this year are finding out it doesn't make them immune from the virus. New figures from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show this year's vaccine isn't as reliable as in years past.

 

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// by Homeland Security Today

CDC Airs Katrina issues

At a rowdy public meeting Monday, officials with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention restated the agency’s earlier call for Hurricane Katrina victims to be moved out of government trailers and mobile homes as soon as possible because already high levels of formaldehyde in the units could spike in the summer heat.

 

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// by Homeland Security Today

Bird Flu Breaks Out In Tibet, Claims Another Life In China

The Ministry of Agriculture in China has confirmed there is an outbreak of H5N1 bird flu in Tibet, the second this year. This follows confirmation that a a 22 year old man from central China died of the virus last month. Chinese authorities said the Tibetan outbreak started on 6th February, in a small community… Keep Reading

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// by Homeland Security Today

Experts Suggest Ways to Curb Ill-Effects of Avian Flu

The Influenza Foundation of India (IFI), an advisory body to bring awareness on the disease as also its prevention and control, has issued several recommendations to curb the ill-effects of seasonal influenza, especially during the avian flu outbreak. Stating that in India’s healthcare map avian influenza is currently the most disturbing disease with bird flu… Keep Reading

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// by Homeland Security Today

More Microbiology Clinics Could Curb New Illnesses, Says Experts

The dearth of microbiology clinical laboratories keeps the country vulnerable to infectious diseases like avian influenza and tuberculosis, a top microbiologist said here over the weekend. "There is no a single sufficient microbiology clinical lab in Indonesia," Pratiwi Pujilestari Sudarmono told students and government officials during her inauguration as professor at the University of Indonesia’s… Keep Reading

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// by Homeland Security Today

Report urges USDA to tighten oversight of pandemic planning

The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) has made notable progress on plans to detect and contain H5N1 avian influenza outbreaks in birds, but some management missteps at the agency could hamper its response capability, according to a recent audit by the department's inspector general. In the 33-page report, the inspector general's office reviewed 55 tasks assigned to the USDA in the Bush administration's national pandemic influenza strategy that were to be completed by February 2007. The USDA is responsible for leading the veterinary response to an H5N1 threat.

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// by Homeland Security Today

Biodefense Watchdog Group Disbands

With less than nine months before the U.S. Department of Homeland Security decides where to site its disease research lab, proponents and opponents of the National Bio and Agro Defense Facility continue to plead their cases before government leaders and the business community.

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// by Homeland Security Today

Bio lab debate goes on tour

With less than nine months before the U.S. Department of Homeland Security decides where to site its disease research lab, proponents and opponents of the National Bio and Agro Defense Facility continue to plead their cases before government leaders and the business community.

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New Decontamination System Kills Anthrax Rapidly Without Lingering Effects

In October 2001, letters containing anthrax spores were mailed to several news media offices and two U.S. senators, killing five people and infecting 17 others. Clearing the Senate office building of the spores with chlorine dioxide gas cost $27 million, according to the Government Accountability Office. Cleaning the Brentwood postal facility outside Washington cost $130 million and took 26 months.

Researchers at the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) in collaboration with Austin-based Stellar Micro Devices, Inc. (SMD) have developed prototypes of a rapid, non-disruptive and less expensive method that could be used to decontaminate bioterrorism hazards in the future.

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// by Homeland Security Today

Health IT Funding Hike Sought by White House

The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology would receive a 7.7 percent funding hike under President Bush’s fiscal year 2009 budget proposal.

ONCHIT, the Health and Human Services Department's health information technology arm, promotes electronic medical record adoption. In a Monday press conference, HHS Secretary Mike Leavitt cited EMR technology as a critical component in changing the nation’s health care system and correcting the course of Medicare.

Leavitt described Medicare, on its current trajectory, as “eleven years from going broke.”

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// by Homeland Security Today

The Chemical Conundrum

In seeking to protect America’s chemical infrastructure, DHS has taken on new regulatory tasks. Is the agency up to the job—and are the rules fair?

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The chains that bind

Public health authorities increasingly are concerned about what’s being done to ensure that vital supply lines are kept open for respirators, ventilators, everyday medications, intravenous tubing and other basic medical necessities that will quickly be exhausted and difficult to restock given that most hospitals’ inventories are replenished “just in time.” Keep Reading

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