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New Orleans Man Charged by Federal Grand Jury for Alleged Possession of About 100 Machine Gun Conversion Devices

The case was investigated by the New Orleans Police Department and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives.

U.S. Attorney Duane A. Evans announced that Kody Severin, age 25, a resident of New Orleans, Louisiana, was charged on January 26, 2023 in a seven-count indictment by a federal grand jury for violations of the Federal Gun Control Act and the Federal Controlled Substances Act, and for attempted obstruction of justice.

Severin is charged in Count 1 with possession with intent to distribute marijuana, in violation of Title 21, United States Code, Sections 841(a)(1) and (b)(1)(D).  In Count 2, Severin is charged with possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime, in violation of Title 18, United States Code, Section 924(c)(1)(A).  In Count 3 and Count 6, Severin is charged with possession of firearms by a convicted felon, in violation of Title 18, United States Code, Section 922(g)(1).  Count 4 changes Severin with the possession of approximately 100 machineguns, that is, multiple types of machinegun conversion devices, which qualify as “machineguns” under Title 26, United States Code, Section 5845(b), in violation of Title 18, United States Code, Section 922(o).  Count 5 charges Severin with possession of unregistered firearms, including silencers, destructive devices, and approximately 100 machinegun conversion devices, in violation of Title 26, United States Code, Section 5861(d).  Count 7 charges Severin with attempting to obstruct justice in violation of Title 18, United States Code, Section 1512(b)(1).

If convicted of Count 1, Severin faces a maximum sentence of 5 years imprisonment, up to a $250,000 fine, and at least 2 years of supervised release .  If convicted of Count 2, Severin faces a mandatory minimum sentence of 5 years up to life imprisonment, which is to run consecutively to all other sentences, up to a $250,000 fine, and up to 5 years of supervised release .  If convicted of Count 3 or Count 6, Severin faces a maximum term of imprisonment of 15 years, up to a $250,000 fine, and up to 3 years of supervised release.  If convicted of Count 4, Severin faces a maximum term of imprisonment of 10 years, up to a $250,000 fine, and up to 3 years of supervised release.  If convicted of Count 5, Severin faces a maximum term of imprisonment of 10 years, up to a $10,000 fine, and up to 3 years of supervised release.  If convicted of Count 7, Severin faces a maximum term of imprisonment of 20 years, up to a $250,000 fine, and up to 3 years of supervised release. For each count, Severin also faces the payment of a $100 mandatory special assessment fee.

U. S. Attorney Evans reiterated that the indictment is merely a charge and that the guilt of the defendant must be proven beyond a reasonable doubt.

The case was investigated by the New Orleans Police Department and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives.  It is being prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorney David Haller of the Violent Crime Unit of the U.S. Attorney’s Office.

Read more at the Justice Department

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Homeland Security Today
The Government Technology & Services Coalition's Homeland Security Today (HSToday) is the premier news and information resource for the homeland security community, dedicated to elevating the discussions and insights that can support a safe and secure nation. A non-profit magazine and media platform, HSToday provides readers with the whole story, placing facts and comments in context to inform debate and drive realistic solutions to some of the nation’s most vexing security challenges.
Homeland Security Today
Homeland Security Todayhttp://www.hstoday.us
The Government Technology & Services Coalition's Homeland Security Today (HSToday) is the premier news and information resource for the homeland security community, dedicated to elevating the discussions and insights that can support a safe and secure nation. A non-profit magazine and media platform, HSToday provides readers with the whole story, placing facts and comments in context to inform debate and drive realistic solutions to some of the nation’s most vexing security challenges.

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