76.5 F
Washington D.C.
Saturday, July 20, 2024

National Hurricane Preparedness Week: Stay Protected During Storms

Make sure to have Wireless Emergency Alerts enabled on your phone to receive Warnings and other alerts. Always pay attention to the latest forecast as conditions can change quickly.

During a storm, whether you’ve evacuated or are sheltering in place, know what to expect from the hazards you may face. Remain vigilant, stay up-to-date with the latest forecasts and alerts, and continue to listen to local officials.

Stay in your safe places from water & wind

Always keep a safe distance from flooded and damaged areas. When you’re at risk from storm surge or flooding, it’s important to get to high ground away from bodies of water and any flood-prone areas. Evacuate if told to do so. Never drive through floodwaters or compromised bridges. Always pay attention to barriers and signage.

If your house becomes flooded and you’re still there, get higher in your house to escape the flood waters. If the highest floor of your home becomes dangerous, get on the roof and call 911.

Though rain and storm surge cause more direct deaths, wind can also be very destructive and deadly in hurricanes. Winds can be stronger higher above ground level. This can put high-rise buildings at a greater risk. To protect yourself from wind, the best thing you can do is put as many walls as possible between you and the outside. An interior room without windows is the safest place you can be in a building. You can cover yourself with a mattress and wear a helmet for added protection. If your area is under an Extreme Wind Warning, take shelter immediately. Make sure to stay sheltered until the threat is gone.

Have a way to get weather alerts and forecast updates

Make sure to have Wireless Emergency Alerts enabled on your phone to receive Warnings and other alerts. Always pay attention to the latest forecast as conditions can change quickly and storms can rapidly intensify from a tropical storm to a major hurricane. Even small changes in the storm’s track can make a big difference.

Keep in mind that impacts can be felt far from the coast

Remain vigilant even if you’re far from the most damaging winds. Inland flooding can be felt hundreds of miles from the coast. Never drive through floodwaters! A car can be swept away with only a foot of water, and there’s no way to know if the road itself has collapsed when hidden by water.

Listen to local officials & avoid travel unless ordered to evacuate

Local officials can provide you with up-to-date information as the situation changes in your area. Evacuation orders may still be given at this late stage — leave immediately if ordered! Follow recommended evacuation routes — do not take shortcuts, as they may be blocked. Be alert for road hazards such as washed-out roads or bridges and downed power lines. Never drive through floodwaters.

Tornadoes

ANY tropical system is capable of producing tornadoes!  Tropical tornadoes are often short lived but they can produced enhanced areas of damage.  Sometimes these tornadoes can occur in the outer rain bands, well ahead of the center of the storm.  In 2019 Hurricane Dorian produced an EF-2 tornado in Emerald Isle, NC with estimated winds of 115 MPH.  In 2018, Hurricane Florence produced 27 tornadoes in North Carolina! To prepare for the possibility of tornadoes it’s important to have multiple ways to receive warnings, so you can seek shelter quickly if a warning is issued for your area.

Identify Your Trusted Sources of Information

​NOAA’s National Hurricane Center is your official source for hurricane forecasts and the issuance of hurricane watches and warnings. Your local NOAA National Weather Service forecast office provides information regarding the expected impacts from the storm for your area. Emergency managers will make the decisions regarding evacuations.

Organizations such as FLASH make disaster safety recommendations. And the media outlets will broadcast this information to you. All work together to be your trusted sources, especially for those less able to take care of themselves.

Here are some additional suggestions regarding where to get trusted tropical storm and hurricane information:

  • Television:  Tune in to your trusted local news source.
  • Phone:  Access mobile.weather.gov on your mobile phone and get Wireless Emergency Alerts.
  • Radio:  Receive forecast information and news on your NOAA Weather Radio.
  • Social Media:  Follow official government agencies, trusted media partners, and share critical information with friends and family.
  • Computer:  Access information from weather.gov, ready.gov, readync.org, and flash.org.

Read more at National Weather Service

Homeland Security Today
Homeland Security Todayhttp://www.hstoday.us
The Government Technology & Services Coalition's Homeland Security Today (HSToday) is the premier news and information resource for the homeland security community, dedicated to elevating the discussions and insights that can support a safe and secure nation. A non-profit magazine and media platform, HSToday provides readers with the whole story, placing facts and comments in context to inform debate and drive realistic solutions to some of the nation’s most vexing security challenges.

Related Articles

STAY CONNECTED

- Advertisement -

Latest Articles