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New Paper Addresses Recruiting and Clearing Personnel with Foreign Ties

The paper offers several recommendations that the U.S. national security apparatus should pursue to clear a diverse workforce.

In a new white paper, INSA calls for the Intelligence Community (IC) security apparatus to review its assumptions around clearing U.S. citizens with foreign ties in order to attract and retain a world class IC workforce.

Developed by INSA’s Security Policy Reform Council, the paper, Promoting Cultural Diversity in the Intelligence Community: Recruiting and Clearing Personnel with Foreign Ties, (pdf) reveals that while the IC views recruiting and retaining a culturally diverse workforce as a strategic priority, the security clearance process does not lend itself to the achievement of this aim.

“To understand dynamics in foreign countries, intelligence agencies need to hire people with native language skills, cultural expertise, and experience living and traveling abroad, many of whom have family and friends overseas and relatives who are not U.S. citizens,” said Larry Hanauer, INSA’s Vice President for Policy.  “Although these patriotic Americans are positioned to make unique contributions to the Intelligence Community, the government’s approach of eliminating, rather than mitigating, risk makes it inordinately difficult for them to receive a security clearance.  Consequently, candidates with backgrounds that bring new perspectives, challenge traditional biases, and draw on deep cultural knowledge struggle to contribute to the U.S. national security mission, and the IC loses out in the competition for top talent.”

The paper offers several recommendations that the U.S. national security apparatus should pursue to clear a diverse workforce:

  • Identify the “essential skills” necessary to fill mission-critical roles;
  • Train recruitment teams on practices regarding the assessment of applicants’ foreign ties;
  • Develop bias awareness training for all officials involved in recruitment, hiring, and investigations;
  • Direct employees with high-risk foreign ties to security and counterintelligence trainings; and
  • Compile lessons learned and share best practices with industry.

Read the paper at INSA

Homeland Security Todayhttp://www.hstoday.us
The Government Technology & Services Coalition's Homeland Security Today (HSToday) is the premier news and information resource for the homeland security community, dedicated to elevating the discussions and insights that can support a safe and secure nation. A non-profit magazine and media platform, HSToday provides readers with the whole story, placing facts and comments in context to inform debate and drive realistic solutions to some of the nation’s most vexing security challenges.

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