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Wednesday, October 5, 2022
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Possible Chemical Suicides Endanger First Responders

Last week, three law enforcement officers in Georgia were hospitalized after being exposed to toxic fumes at the scene of a possible chemical suicide.

Chemical suicides involve people mixing easily-attainable chemicals to produce a toxic gas, which can kill rather quickly. Often this is done in an enclosed space such as a car; occasionally people use “exit bags,” or plastic bags placed over the head connected to a gas supply. Instructions are unfortunately readily available on the internet.

In many but not all chemical suicide incidents, the victim leaves a written warning for whomever will find them. Typically, the first instinct when faced with an unconscious person in a car is to open a door or break a window; in a home or hotel, rushing in after gaining access is also the norm. Though well intended, these actions also endanger first responders or anyone else attempting to render aid.

Learn more at Hazmatnation.

Homeland Security Todayhttp://www.hstoday.us
The Government Technology & Services Coalition's Homeland Security Today (HSToday) is the premier news and information resource for the homeland security community, dedicated to elevating the discussions and insights that can support a safe and secure nation. A non-profit magazine and media platform, HSToday provides readers with the whole story, placing facts and comments in context to inform debate and drive realistic solutions to some of the nation’s most vexing security challenges.

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