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Tuesday, June 18, 2024

Ph.D. Student Found Guilty of Terrorism After Building a Drone to Give to ISIS

His devices also documented conversations on how he had researched and worked out how to get the drone into a war zone without being stopped by authorities. He also set up a spoof company so he could pretend to be traveling on business.

A man has been found guilty of preparing acts of terrorism after building a drone with the intention of supplying it to a banned terrorist organization.

The jury at Birmingham Crown Court in the U.K. heard how PhD student Mohamad Al-Bared, aged 26 of Kare Road in Coventry, made the drone specifically to transport an explosive or chemical weapon into enemy territory for ISIS. Component parts for the drone were made on his 3D printer found at his home address.

He was arrested on January 31 in Coventry as his home address was raided by officers who seized the drone, 3D printer and several devices including phones and laptop.

Following intricate analysis of these devices, detectives revealed a series of conversations on his devices clearly demonstrating his support for ISIS as well as extremist material and violent propaganda videos.

During a search of his address, detectives also found notebooks detailing chemical equations and recipes for chemical weapons. Despite Al-Bared having studied mechanical and chemical engineering, it was clear that the chemicals referenced were to be used as weapons rather than as part of his studies.

His devices also documented conversations on how he had researched and worked out how to get the drone into a war zone without being stopped by authorities. He also set up a spoof company so he could pretend to be traveling on business.

“Al-Bared was a calculated individual and coupled with his education and expertise in mechanical and chemical engineering he was clearly very dangerous,” Head of Counter Terrorism Policing West Midlands, Detective Chief Superintendent Mark Payne said. “He has made a purpose-built drone able to carry explosives or chemicals to be used as a weapon in a war zone, thankfully he was unable to continue his efforts following his swift arrest earlier this year. The jury heard how security conscious he was, going to great lengths to try to hide anything that might lead to his identification. This verdict means a dangerous individual has been taken off our streets, there is no place in our society for individuals intent on participating in terrorism activity.”

Al-Bared will be sentenced on November 27.

Read more at Counter Terrorism Policing

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Homeland Security Today
The Government Technology & Services Coalition's Homeland Security Today (HSToday) is the premier news and information resource for the homeland security community, dedicated to elevating the discussions and insights that can support a safe and secure nation. A non-profit magazine and media platform, HSToday provides readers with the whole story, placing facts and comments in context to inform debate and drive realistic solutions to some of the nation’s most vexing security challenges.
Homeland Security Today
Homeland Security Todayhttp://www.hstoday.us
The Government Technology & Services Coalition's Homeland Security Today (HSToday) is the premier news and information resource for the homeland security community, dedicated to elevating the discussions and insights that can support a safe and secure nation. A non-profit magazine and media platform, HSToday provides readers with the whole story, placing facts and comments in context to inform debate and drive realistic solutions to some of the nation’s most vexing security challenges.

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